Revelatory in its concentrated brevity, a new contribution from ariel shibolet (untitled 1959) crosses international boundaries

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live at the total music meeting

 

 Jason Bivins, Cadence Magazine

This little known label has snuck out some gems in the last few years, and these releases featuring saxophonist Shibolet are compelling. (1) Starts at the dog whistle end of the spectrum, more Jack Wright and Bhob Rainey than Lacy and Parker perhaps (although Shibolet’s careful sculpting of rough overtones during passages of circular breathing is certainly EP-ish). A tight focused display of technique and vision, Shibolet’s performance is filled with ideas but never seems merely like a cycle through the notebook. There’s instead a real warmth to his playing, as out as it sometimes gets. He hums along with himself through the horn on several occasions, and it’s usually quite tonal, as if he’s backing himself up by remembering Giuffre tunes or something (these snatches of melody emerge in an almost subliminal sense). But he can also dazzle with the sheer amount of sound he generates, specifically with an effect that sounds like two or three people bowing metal and getting rough oscillations. At times things can get a bit desultory, as with the clicks and grainy breath sounds on much of the second piece. But for the most part I enjoyed this very much, and was especially impressed by Shibolet’s wonderful variations on buzzing metal (which favorably recall John Butcher) and his moments of experimenting with line (which he backs with rough moaning, creating something like a multi-tracking effect).